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  • In Austral Summer 1994-95 the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys over the Antarctic Peninsular. During this cruise five (5) research programmes were conducted for a total approximately of 4469 km of multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data. The research programmes were: SEDANO (SEdiment Drifts of the ANtarctic Offshore) with 1340 km of MCS data ; SITE SURVEY, ODP Proposal # 452 (Antarctic Glacial History and Sea-Level Change) with 507 km of MCS data; SANSCRITO (Seismic ANalysis SCotia Ridge Tectonic Outcome) with 1990 km of MCS data and ANGELINA (ANtarctic GEophysical Long range INternational Acquisition programme) with 632 km of MCS data. During the Programme SEDANO nine (9) 60-fold multichannel seismic lines were collected in the Antarctic Peninsular. The surveys were carried out by the research vessel OGS Explora. The digital MCS data were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of two GI guns with a total volume of 6.7 litres fired approximately every 25 meters into a 3000 m cable consisting of 120 hydrophone groups for the 60-fold profiles. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for the navigation. The Chief Scientist on this programme was: Angelo Camerlenghi of the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, Borgo Grotta Gigante n. 42/C, 34010 Sgonico (Trieste), Italy. Processing of the data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Trace-sum with differential NMO, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Filter, Balance.

  • During austral summer1996/97 the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, on board the research vessel OGS-Explora, conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys along the Antarctic Peninsula. The SEDANO II (SEdiment Drifts of the ANtarctic Offshore) programme was the continuation of SEDANO I , acquired in 1995 (SDLS-47). This interdiciplinary programme included geology, geophysics and oceanography for the study of the sedimentary sequences of the continental rise of the Pacific Margin in the Antarctic Peninsula. During this programme 712 km of 60-fold multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, 8 second records, 2 ms sample rate and 286 km of single channel seismic reflection (SCS) data, 3 seconds, 1 ms sample rate, were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of an airgun array with a total volume of 60 litres, fired every 25 meters into a 3000 m cable consisting of 120 hydrophone groups towed at an average depth of 12 m for the MCS data. The SCS data were acquired every 12,5 meters into a 18 m cable consisting of 8 hydrophone groups towed at an average depth of 3 m, except line IT97AP242H acquired every 25 m, 8 seconds and 2 ms sample rate. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for navigation. The Chief Scientists on this programme was: Angelo Camerlenghi of the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, Borgo Grotta Gigante n. 42/C, 34010 Sgonico (Trieste), Italy. Processing of the MCS data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Mixing, Filter, Dynamic trace equalisation. The SCS data were processed using the following sequence: Reformat, Quality control, Deconvolution, Sum traces (from 8 to 1), Mute, Mixing, Filter, Dynamic trace equalisation.

  • During austral summer1994/95, the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, on board the research vessel OGS-Explora, conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys along the Antarctic Peninsula. The SANSCRITO (Seismic ANalysis SCotia RIdge Tectonic Outcome) programme was a seismic exploration cruise in the Scotia Sea to understand the tectonic history and evolution of the region; data were collected between longitude 45 and 54 degrees West, and latitude 59 and 65 degrees South. During this programme 1990 km of 30-fold multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, 14 second records, 4 ms sample rate, were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of an airgun array with a total volume of 80 litres fired every 50 meters into a 3000 m cable consisting of 120 hydrophone groups towed at an average depth of 12 m. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for navigation. The Chief Scientist on this programme was: Emanuele Lodolo of the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, Borgo Grotta Gigante n. 42/C, 34010 Sgonico (Trieste), Italy. Processing of the data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Trace-sum with differential NMO, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Mixing, Filter, and Dynamic trace equalisation.

  • During austral summer1996/97 the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, on board the research vessel OGS-Explora, conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys along the Antarctic Peninsula. The SEDANO II (SEdiment Drifts of the ANtarctic Offshore) programme was the continuation of SEDANO I , acquired in 1995 (SDLS-47). This interdiciplinary programme included geology, geophysics and oceanography for the study of the sedimentary sequences of the continental rise of the Pacific Margin in the Antarctic Peninsula. During this programme 712 km of 60-fold multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, 8 second records, 2 ms sample rate and 286 km of single channel seismic reflection (SCS) data, 3 seconds, 1 ms sample rate, were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of an airgun array with a total volume of 60 litres, fired every 25 meters into a 3000 m cable consisting of 120 hydrophone groups towed at an average depth of 12 m for the MCS data. The SCS data were acquired every 12,5 meters into a 18 m cable consisting of 8 hydrophone groups towed at an average depth of 3 m, except line IT97AP242H acquired every 25 m, 8 seconds and 2 ms sample rate. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for navigation. The Chief Scientists on this programme was: Angelo Camerlenghi of the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS, Borgo Grotta Gigante n. 42/C, 34010 Sgonico (Trieste), Italy. Processing of the MCS data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Mixing, Filter, Dynamic trace equalisation. The SCS data were processed using the following sequence: Reformat, Quality control, Deconvolution, Sum traces (from 8 to 1), Mute, Mixing, Filter, Dynamic trace equalisation.

  • During the Antarctic summer 1988-89, a geophysical survey (seismic, gravity and magnetics) was carried out by the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS of Trieste, Italy, in the Ross Sea with the Research Vessel O.G.S. Explora. 23 lines of total length 4113.1 Km were collected. The cruise began on December 10,1988 from the harbor of Hobart (Australia) and ended on January 15, 1989, with its arrival in Dunedin (New Zealand). Gravimetric and geomagnetic data were continuously acquired during the cruise, with minor interruptions due to adverse sea conditions. The multichannel seismic survey was run in the Ross Sea from December 18 to January 8. The project has been financially supported by the Italian Antarctic Program (PNRA).

  • In December 1989 the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys off the Pacific Margin of the Antarctic Peninsula, in the Weddell Sea and over Admundsen Sea. This cruise collected approximately 3,478.4 km of 30-fold multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data. The surveys extended between longitudes 41 and 99 degrees west, and between latitudes 61 and 69 degrees south. The surveys were carried out by the research vessel OGS Explora. The digital MCS data were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of an airgun array with a total volume of 45.16 litres fired approximately every 50 meters. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for navigation. Processing of the data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Trace-sum with differential NMO, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Mixing, Filter, Balance.

  • During Austral Summer1990-91 the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys in the Ross Sea, over Weddel Sea and in the Balleny Zone of the MacQuarie Triple Junction. This cruise collected approximately 6036 km of multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data. The surveys extended, in different areas, between longitudes 37 and 56 degrees west, and between latitudes 59 and 62 degrees south (Weddel Sea), between longitudes 171 east and 178 degrees west, and between latitudes 71 and 73 degrees south (Ross Sea), between longitudes 150 and 158 degrees east , and between latitudes 51 and 62 degrees south (Balleny). The surveys were carried out by the research vessel OGS Explora. The digital MCS data were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of an airgun array with variable configuration from a total volume of 45.16 litres fired approximately every 50 meters. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for navigation. Processing of the data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Trace-sum with differential NMO, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Mixing, Filter, Balance.

  • During the Antarctic summer 1988-89, a geophysical survey (seismic, gravity and magnetics) was carried out by the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS of Trieste, Italy, in the Ross Sea with the Research Vessel O.G.S. Explora. 23 lines of total length 4113.1 Km were collected. The cruise began on December 10,1988 from the harbor of Hobart (Australia) and ended on January 15, 1989, with its arrival in Dunedin (New Zealand). Gravimetric and geomagnetic data were continuously acquired during the cruise, with minor interruptions due to adverse sea conditions. The multichannel seismic survey was run in the Ross Sea from December 18 to January 8. The project has been financially supported by the Italian Antarctic Program (PNRA).

  • During the Antarctic summer 1988-89, a geophysical survey (seismic, gravity and magnetics) was carried out by the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS of Trieste, Italy, in the Ross Sea with the Research Vessel O.G.S. Explora. 23 lines of total length 4113.1 Km were collected. The cruise began on December 10,1988 from the harbor of Hobart (Australia) and ended on January 15, 1989, with its arrival in Dunedin (New Zealand). Gravimetric and geomagnetic data were continuously acquired during the cruise, with minor interruptions due to adverse sea conditions. The multichannel seismic survey was run in the Ross Sea from December 18 to January 8. The project has been financially supported by the Italian Antarctic Program (PNRA).

  • In December 1989 the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics - OGS conducted marine geological and geophysical surveys off the Pacific Margin of the Antarctic Peninsula, in the Weddell Sea and over Admundsen Sea. This cruise collected approximately 3,478.4 km of 30-fold multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data. The surveys extended between longitudes 41 and 99 degrees west, and between latitudes 61 and 69 degrees south. The surveys were carried out by the research vessel OGS Explora. The digital MCS data were recorded on a SERCEL SN 358 DMX system. The source consisted of an airgun array with a total volume of 45.16 litres fired approximately every 50 meters. A GPS + TRANSIT satellite receiver system was used for navigation. Processing of the data generally followed a conventional sequence: Reformat, Trace-sum with differential NMO, Quality control, Amplitude recovery, Deconvolution, Velocity analysis, NMO corrections, Mute, Trace weighting, Stack, Mixing, Filter, Balance.